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TU Berlin

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Nicole Dörr

Lupe

"My research investigates how increased linguistic and cultural diversity fosters democratic innovation in the areas of social movements, local democracy and participation by migrants and minorities. Previous democratic theorists have argued that linguistic differences foster inequality and impede democratic processes. However, in my empirical work, I explore the collective practices of cultural and political translation, which can help multilingual and diverse groups work together more democratically than homogeneous groups."

 

Scientific Career

Since 2016: Professor of Sociology, University of Copenhagen

2016 – 2018: IPODI Fellow

2013-2016: Assistant Professor of International Relations, Mount Holyoke College

2010-2012: Marie Curie Postdoctoral Fellow at Harvard University and at the University of California, Irvine

2004-2009: Ph.D. in Social and Political Sciences, European University Institute in Florence

 

Research interests

  • Democracy, Culture, Multilingual Societies, Social Movements, Migration
  • Deliberation, Gender, Intersectionality, Comparison, US, Europe, South Africa
  • Qualitative Methods, Visual analysis, Right-wing Mobilization

 

Contact

Email: nd[at]soc.ku.dk

Webpage

IPODI Research Project

Translating Diversity: Discursive Practices on Migration, and Linguistic and Gender Diversity

Duration: 1 June 2016 - 31 May 2018

Mentor: Prof. Dr. Sabine Hark, Faculty I, Zentrum für Interdisziplinäre Frauen- und Geschlechterforschung

Abstract: Based on case studies in Germany and Denmark, this project aims at comparing public discourse and civic deliberation on the issues of migration, gender and cultural diversity set in the context of the European ‘refugee crisis.’ Designed as a pilot study, the project explores the potential relevance of intersectional practices of political translation, developed by self-organized refugee groups and supporters, can have at the local level to include different linguistic groups and minorities in democratic public dialogue. Political translation, distinct from linguistic translation, is a set of social practices developed by global justice activists, LGBT and grassroots community organizers in Europe and the US in order to address inequities hindering democratic deliberation and to work together more inclusively with disempowered groups including migrants and minorities. In the IPODI project, I will explore the diffusion of an intersectional knowledge on political translation resulting from multilingual democracy experiments in encounters between social movement groups, migrants and refugees, and local educators working on gender justice, cultural diversity, and democratic inclusion in Germany and Denmark.

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